function myfunction(txt) { alert(txt) } function"> By pressing the button, a function will be called. The function will alert using the argument text. Dec 5, 2017 The function.arguments property refers to an an array-like object corresponding to the arguments passed to a function. Use the simple variable arguments instead. This property is forbidden in strict model due to taill call optimization. Feb 2, 2016 This method of passing in functions to other functions to use them inside is used in JavaScript libraries almost everywhere. The common name for the function passed in is a callback function. In computer programming, a callback is a piece of executable code that is passed as an argument to other code.">

Javascript Function Like Argumentative Essay

Posted on by Toll

The object is an -like object corresponding to the arguments passed to a function.

The source for this interactive example is stored in a GitHub repository. If you'd like to contribute to the interactive examples project, please clone https://github.com/mdn/interactive-examples and send us a pull request.

Syntax

arguments

Description

The object is a local variable available within all (non-arrow) functions. You can refer to a function's arguments within the function by using the object. This object contains an entry for each argument passed to the function, the first entry's index starting at 0. For example, if a function is passed three arguments, you can refer to them as follows:

arguments[0] arguments[1] arguments[2]

The arguments can also be set:

arguments[1] = 'new value';

The object is not an . It is similar to an , but does not have any properties except . For example, it does not have the method. However it can be converted to a real :

var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments); var args = [].slice.call(arguments); // ES2015 const args = Array.from(arguments);

Using slice on arguments prevents optimizations in some JavaScript engines (V8 for example - more information). If you care for them, try constructing a new array by iterating through the arguments object instead. An alternative would be to use the despised constructor as a function:

var args = (arguments.length === 1 ? [arguments[0]] : Array.apply(null, arguments));

You can use the object if you call a function with more arguments than it is formally declared to accept. This technique is useful for functions that can be passed a variable number of arguments. Use to determine the number of arguments passed to the function, and then process each argument by using the object. To determine the number of parameters in the function signature, use the property.

Using with Arguments

The typeof arguments returns 'object'. 

console.log(typeof arguments); // 'object'

The typeof individual arguments can be determined with the use of indexing.

console.log(typeof arguments[0]); //this will return the typeof individual arguments.

Using the Spread Syntax with Arguments

As you could do with any Array-like object, you can also use the method or the spread operator to convert arguments to a real Array:

var args = Array.from(arguments); var args = [...arguments];

Properties

Reference to the currently executing function.
Reference to the function that invoked the currently executing function.
Reference to the number of arguments passed to the function.
Returns a new Array Iterator object that contains the values for each index in the arguments.

Examples

Defining a function that concatenates several strings

This example defines a function that concatenates several strings. The only formal argument for the function is a string that specifies the characters that separate the items to concatenate. The function is defined as follows:

function myConcat(separator) { var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1); return args.join(separator); }

You can pass any number of arguments to this function, and it creates a list using each argument as an item in the list.

// returns "red, orange, blue" myConcat(', ', 'red', 'orange', 'blue'); // returns "elephant; giraffe; lion; cheetah" myConcat('; ', 'elephant', 'giraffe', 'lion', 'cheetah'); // returns "sage. basil. oregano. pepper. parsley" myConcat('. ', 'sage', 'basil', 'oregano', 'pepper', 'parsley');

Defining a function that creates HTML lists

This example defines a function that creates a string containing HTML for a list. The only formal argument for the function is a string that is "" if the list is to be unordered (bulleted), or "" if the list is to be ordered (numbered). The function is defined as follows:

function list(type) { var result = '<' + type + 'l><li>'; var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1); result += args.join('</li><li>'); result += '</li></' + type + 'l>'; // end list return result; }

You can pass any number of arguments to this function, and it adds each argument as an item to a list of the type indicated. For example:

var listHTML = list('u', 'One', 'Two', 'Three'); /* listHTML is: "<ul><li>One</li><li>Two</li><li>Three</li></ul>" */

Rest, default, and destructured parameters

The object can be used in conjunction with rest, default, and destructured parameters.

function foo(...args) { return args; } foo(1, 2, 3); // [1,2,3]

While the presence of rest, default, or destructured parameters does not alter the behavior of the  object in strict mode code, there is a subtle difference for non-strict code.

When a non-strict function does not contain rest, default, or destructured parameters, then the values in the  object do track the values of the arguments (and vice versa). See the code below:

function func(a) { arguments[0] = 99; // updating arguments[0] also updates a console.log(a); } func(10); // 99

and

function func(a) { a = 99; // updating a also updates arguments[0] console.log(arguments[0]); } func(10); // 99

When a non-strict function does contain rest, default, or destructured parameters, then the values in the  object do not track the values of the arguments (and vice versa). Instead, they reflect the arguments provided at the time of invocation:

function func(a = 55) { arguments[0] = 99; // updating arguments[0] does not also update a console.log(a); } func(10); // 10

and

function func(a = 55) { a = 99; // updating a does not also update arguments[0] console.log(arguments[0]); } func(10); // 10

and

function func(a = 55) { console.log(arguments[0]); } func(); // undefined

Specifications

Browser compatibility

The compatibility table on this page is generated from structured data. If you'd like to contribute to the data, please check out https://github.com/mdn/browser-compat-data and send us a pull request.

DesktopMobileServer
ChromeEdgeFirefoxInternet ExplorerOperaSafariAndroid webviewChrome for AndroidEdge MobileFirefox for AndroidOpera for AndroidiOS SafariSamsung InternetNode.js
Basic supportFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support Yes ? Full support Yes
Full support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support 6Full support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support Yes ? Full support Yes

DeprecatedNon-standard

No support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support? — 9No support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support NoNo support No ? No support No
Full support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support Yes ? Full support Yes
Full support 52 ? Full support 46No support NoFull support YesFull support 9Full support 52Full support 52 ? Full support 46Full support YesFull support 9 ? Full support Yes

Legend

Full support
Full support
No support
No support
Compatibility unknown
Compatibility unknown
Non-standard. Expect poor cross-browser support.
Non-standard. Expect poor cross-browser support.
Deprecated. Not for use in new websites.
Deprecated. Not for use in new websites.

See also

FeatureAndroid webviewChrome for AndroidEdge mobileFirefox for AndroidOpera AndroidiOS SafariSamsung Internet
Basic support Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes ?
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes ?
No No No No No No ?
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes ?
5252 ?46 Yes9 ?

Document Tags and Contributors

 Contributors to this page:LouisLazaris, CarloMartini, wbamberg, fscholz, craigayre, renyuns, chrisdavidmills, i336_, karthikprince2k1, kdex, mediumdeviation, jameshkramer, sumanvyj, rudolfo, nmve, jack-lewin, oksana-khristenko, tungns, vaniananthuni, rousan, poldridge, deepakkapoor, bergus, gustafl, gergob, lessmind, arai, mones-cse, austinylin, Sheppy, Naesten, paulclark, abutterworth, RichardLitt, stevemao, steely.wing, SujayKrishna, Ruakh, Brettz9, ethertank, trevorh, mjhm, behnam, Aaronmcadam, evilpie, AaronAsAChimp, paul.irish, Sevenspade, LJR, Tmm1, Mgjbot, Jo-W, 1212jtraceur, Ilidio, Chbok, Waldo, Ptak82, Nickolay, Maian, Prodoc, Dria

 Last updated by:LouisLazaris,

The property refers to an an array-like object corresponding to the arguments passed to a function. Use the simple variable instead. This property is forbidden in strict model due to taill call optimization.

Description

The syntax is deprecated. The recommended way to access the object available within functions is simply to refer to the variable .

In the case of recursion, i.e. if function appears several times on the call stack, the value of represents the arguments corresponding to the most recent invocation of the function.

The value of the arguments property is normally null if there is no outstanding invocation of the function in progress (that is, the function has been called but has not yet returned.

Examples

function f(n) { g(n - 1); } function g(n) { console.log('before: ' + g.arguments[0]); if (n > 0) { f(n); } console.log('after: ' + g.arguments[0]); } f(2); console.log('returned: ' + g.arguments); // Output // before: 1 // before: 0 // after: 0 // after: 1 // returned: null

Specifications

Browser compatibility

The compatibility table on this page is generated from structured data. If you'd like to contribute to the data, please check out https://github.com/mdn/browser-compat-data and send us a pull request.

FeatureChromeEdgeFirefoxInternet ExplorerOperaSafari
Basic support Yes Yes1 Yes Yes Yes
FeatureAndroid webviewChrome for AndroidEdge mobileFirefox for AndroidOpera AndroidiOS SafariSamsung Internet
Basic support Yes Yes Yes4 Yes Yes ?
DesktopMobileServer
ChromeEdgeFirefoxInternet ExplorerOperaSafariAndroid webviewChrome for AndroidEdge MobileFirefox for AndroidOpera for AndroidiOS SafariSamsung InternetNode.js
Basic support

Deprecated

Full support YesFull support YesFull support 1Full support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support YesFull support 4Full support YesFull support Yes ? Full support Yes

Legend

Full support
Full support
Compatibility unknown
Compatibility unknown
Deprecated. Not for use in new websites.
Deprecated. Not for use in new websites.

See also

Document Tags and Contributors

 Contributors to this page:rwaldron, AlisaTerzieva, saintstarrow, fscholz, jameshkramer, ziyunfei, Mingun, surjikal, Sheppy, ethertank, evilpie, Mgjbot, Nickolay, Maian

 Last updated by:rwaldron,

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