Free Essays On Police Technology

Police Technology Essay

Knowing that they have a camera attached to them, this may cause the officer to act differently and pay more attention to following the rules. The same applies for citizens, knowing they are being recorded can cause them to take a different action. The camera causes people to experience self-awareness which causes them to avoid negative behavior in fear of being exposed.
The traffic camera has also come under fire for violating the rights of citizens. The traffic camera is mounted at an intersection and records traffic violations by taking a picture of the driver and the tag of the vehicle ("How Stuff Works," 2014). The traffic camera, also known as the red light camera, has been criticized as a revenue maker rather than a device used for safety. The other man concern is that the video captures the passengers of the vehicle and can be used as a surveillance camera by law enforcement or government officials. There have also been accusations that the device violates the constitutional rights of drivers, stating that the burden of proof should be on the state to determine the identity of the driver, and not the driver. There have been cases where a judge will agree and drop the charges such as a Pasco County, Florida case where the judge ruled that the camera was unconstitutional; however, the cameras still remain (Kilmas, 2012). The video from traffic cameras can also capture private moments such as a husband cheating on his wife, or someone not properly dressed, which can be used to in court or as a way of embarrassing someone.
The newest method of using video technology is the unmanned drone which comes in several forms. Widely used by the military, drones are aircraft that do not carry a human operator and are capable of flight under remote control or autonomous programming. Drones can range in size from an insect to a full size jet ("Department of Defense Military Terms," 2013, p. 283). Drones are commonly recognized from their military use and publicity in killing terrorists overseas. The use of drones on American soil has recently gained notoriety when it was discovered that they were used to strike a target in the United States. The use of drones has also been adopted by the United States Border Patrol to help detect illegal activity on the Mexican border.
In 2012, Congress has mandated the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to develop a plan to integrate drones into the national airspace system. This shows the commitment to use unmanned aircraft in the United States for multiple uses. Understanding the advantage of drones, local law enforcement agencies have also started showing interest in using the drones for multiple tasks. Currently, several police departments are using drones to help their tactical teams safely survey an area where a armed subject may be. The drones can be equipped with high powered cameras, thermal imaging, or even license plate readers. Tactically, the drone gives police a large advantage in knowing what to...

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Essay on Technology and Policing

2089 Words9 Pages

Introduction
The use of technology in the policing domain has been rapidly adopted over the past few years. However, it should be noted that the process of adopting and effectively using technology in law enforcement, begun more than 50 years ago. For instance, it become apparent in the 1950’s that computer would enable easier storage and retrieval of large amounts of data. More recently, advancement in technology has incorporated more sophisticated ways of transmitting and analyzing information, therefore aiding the law enforcement process (Button, Sharples & Harper, 2007). The police have found various aspect of technology useful; predominantly, computer crime mapping has been widely adopted and consequently received a lot of attention…show more content…

Nevertheless, Button, Sharples & Harper (2007) cited that at the time its full benefits could not be fully realized due to a number of reasons. To begin with, matching data to maps was unrealistic both in terms of time and efforts spend. In addition, technology at the time was either inferior or expensive. For example in the 1970s main frame computers were popular only with large organizations, which were financially strong (Button, Sharples & Harper 2007). Nevertheless, things begun to take a turn in 1980s, whereby prices begun to decline and hence desktops become essential in storing crime reports. More recently, the cost of both computer software and hardware has reduced substantially. In turn its application in, analyzing, investigating, and preventing, crime in its context is equally increasing. At Present crime mapping is possible due to the fact that it utilizes Geographic Information System (GIS). Crime records, which are stored in police desktops, should contain information about the location of the crime and other indication of the crime pattern. If that is the case, the GIS and mapping software will integrate this information with geographical coordinates to provide more detail report on the crime incidents (Goldstein & McEwen, 2009).
Both Goldstein & McEwen, (2009) and Button, Sharples & Harper (2007) studies agree that crime mapping is effective in uncovering and monitoring crime

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