Business Studies Grade 12 Assignment 2014 Silverado

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The Bill of Rights

LESSON PLANS

Visitor from Outer Space: The U.S. is overtaken by space aliens and students are asked to ponder which rights they most value. This highly motivating activity requires students to think about the relative importance of the guarantees of the Bill of Rights by having them select five that they would surrender. Great with all age groups.

 

» First Amendment (Freedom of Speech, Religion, and Press)

LESSON PLANS

Free Speech in Oregon: Students will be able to identify, explain, and understand the right of free expression in the state of Oregon as it is written in the Oregon constitution, the role of the Oregon supreme court in interpreting, limiting, or expanding that right, and the difference between the freedoms guaranteed by our state constitution and the U.S. Constitution. (Richard English, Parkrose High School)

2009 Youth Summit – Democracy & What’s News: What’s a Citizen To Do?

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program Background | Lesson 2 – History of “Free Press” | Lesson 3 – Supreme Court and free press | Lesson 4 – Media Savvy | Lesson 5 – What is the news? | Lesson 6 – Truth in Media | Lesson 7 – Free press around the globe | Lesson 8 – What is new media? | Lesson 9 – Program preparation | Lesson 10 – Program participation

Newsrooms, cybernews, journalism, citizen journalists. Students explore the connections between democracy, the news, and the role of citizens. Lessons range from the historical roots of free press to new social media.

CASE STUDIES

Pangel v. Bend-LaPine School District: A student distributed an underground newspaper that advocated that students disrupt school by doing things like making bomb threats.

State ex rel Oregonian Publishing Co. v. Deiz: The court had to decide whether a juvenile’s court proceedings should be closed to the public and the press.

Cooper v. Eugene School District: Freedom of Religion and religious dress in Oregon’s public schools. (Craig Vattiat, Oregon City High School)

Skywalker Records, Inc. v. Navarro: 2 Live Crew songs are held legally obscene.

Texas v. Johnson | Opinion | Activities:A man’s burning of the American flag as a political protest was allowed as part of his free expression right under the 1st amendment.

Nakashima v. Oregon State Board of Education: The Portland Adventist Academy requested that their basketball games, organized by the Oregon School Activities Association, not be scheduled on Saturday during the day for religious reasons. After receiving complaints from other schools in the tournaments, OSAA informed the school that they could not accommodate the school’s request any longer. The Oregon Supreme Court found that neither the U.S. Constitution nor the Oregon Constitution would be violated by accommodating the school’s request.

 

» Fourth Amendment (Search and Seizure, Warrant Requirement and the Exclusionary Rule)

LESSON PLANS

Search and Seizure in Oregon: Students examine exceptions to the warrant requirement and use case briefs to trace the history of the Exclusionary Rule through the state and federal courts. Students will be able to explain the difference in the federal and state interpretations of the Exclusionary Rule, and recognize the expanded rights given to people in Oregon.

CASE STUDIES

Oregon v. Reigner: Defendants moved to suppress evidence officers obtained at a party where some minors were drinking. Defendants had tried to leave, but officers stopped them. Court granted the motion, arguing that Ds did not possess alcohol at the time and that police needed more than reasonable suspicion to stop defendants.

State of Oregon v. Johnson | Opinion: Salem police illegally seized the clothing of a suspect which tainted the items so that the evidence was excluded even when later seized under a valid warrant.

Vernonia School District v. Acton | Opinion: The school district required a drug test before students were permitted to play sports. Acton claims this violates his 4th amendment rights.

State v. Dominguez-Martinez | Opinion: This lesson will help students examine the use of racial profiling as a law enforcement tool and explore the concept of unreasonable searches and seizures in Oregon.

Kyllo v. United States | Opinion: The results of a scan of a house using a heat sensing device/thermal scanner were used to obtain a search warrant. Thesearch yielded large amounts of marijuana.

State of Oregon v. Smith: Police use a sniff dog to locate the presence of marijuana.

State v. Martin: Officers were investigating a hit and run accident. After knocking on the front door for several minutes, Martin, completely naked and noticeably intoxicated, opened the door and then ran into another room. After discussion, the officers followed Martin inside and she was eventually arrested. The State argued that the officer’s entrance was based on Martin’s consent

State ex rel. Juvenile Dept. of Clackamas County v. M.A.D.: The Oregon Supreme Court decided that an exception should exist for schools to be able to conduct a search of a student’s belongings as part of their “reasonable steps” to protect its students.

State v. B.A.H.: The Court followed the State ex rel. Juvenile Dept. of Clackamas County v. M.A.D. precedent and decided that a school had a right to search a student that was suspected of having drugs.

State v. Yen Lin Wan: The Oregon Court of Appeals decided that evidence of a defendant (who spoke little English) resisting arrest and interfering with officers (when they tried to enter his home) was admissible, but that the there should be a self-defense instruction read to the jury.

State v. M.H.W.: A student admitted to previously smoking marijuana and emptied his pockets at the Dean’s request, revealing a lighter, a tin with marijuana, and a dagger. The State filed a delinquency petition for the equivalent of “carrying a concealed weapon.” The Court of Appeals affirmed the lower court decisions that the search, and its resulting items were admissible evidence, since the student had “consented” to the Dean’s search.

 

» Fifth and Sixth Amendments (Right Against Self-Incrimination, Right to an Attorney)

CASE STUDIES

State v. Davilla: D appealed the state’s use of “aggravating factors” in sentencing guidelines. The court held that the guidelines were not too vague, and that the court did not usurp legislative authority in implementing the guidelines.

State v Machain: Defendant appealed conviction based on “compelling circumstances” during the police interview that led her to confess. The court determined that D should have been informed of Miranda rights and that her testimony was compelled based on the length of interview, pressure during questioning, and questions that assumed her guilt.

State ex rel. Juvenile Dep’t of Marion County v. L.A.W.

Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 : Defendant (12 year old boy) filed motion to suppress confession of sexually penetrating a 10 year old girl on the grounds that he did not knowingly waive his 5th amendment rights.  Court held that the youth waived his rights based on the totality of the circumstances.

State ex rel Juvenile Dept of Lincoln Country v. Cook: Juvenile confesses to crimes but claims that his confession was involuntary and induced by the police.

State v. Haugen: Haugen was convicted of aggravated murder and received a death sentence. On appeal Haugen wanted to drop all legal challenges to his conviction and death sentence and go ahead with the execution. When his appointed lawyers didn’t agree, Haugen wanted to dismiss his lawyers and self-represent. The subsequent litigation revolved around whether or not Haugen was competent to make the decision not to appeal his death sentence, particularly since he has a history of mental health issues and heroin abuse.

State v. Langley: The Oregon Supreme Court decided that it was not appropriate for the trial court to make the decision that Langley would represent himself. His refusal to make any decision or to cooperate, the court said, did NOT represent a “knowing” and “intentional” waiver of the constitutional right to counsel. The court sent the case back to sentencing again, to decide what Langley’s punishment would be.

 

 

» Eighth Amendment (Death Penalty, Cruel and Unusual Punishment)

LESSON PLANS

The Death Penalty in the U.S. and Croatia: Students will debate whether a nation’s constitution should permit it to take a citizen’s life. Students will evaluate their personal views, examine the related points found in the Croatian and United States Constitutions, draft amendments, prepare arguments for their adoption and revisit their personal views.

CASE STUDIES

State of Oregon v. Thorp | Opinion | Handout | General Info | Measure 11: Thorp, age 16, was convicted of 2nd degree rape for having sex with his 13 year old girlfriend and was sentenced to 75 months in jail. Does the minimum sentence of 75 months for second degree rape mandated by Measure 11 violate the “cruel and unusual punishment” clause of the Oregon Constitution?

McGinnis v. State of Texas: A 17 year old is sentenced to death for committing murder.

State v. Haugen: Haugen was convicted of aggravated murder and received a death sentence. On appeal Haugen wanted to drop all legal challenges to his conviction and death sentence and go ahead with the execution. The subsequent litigation revolved around whether or not Haugen was competent to make the decision not to appeal his death sentence, particularly since he has a history of mental health issues and heroin abuse.

 

 

Fourteenth Amendment (Due Process, Property Interests)

CASE STUDIES

Shorb v. Powers School District: A high school girl took a shower in the boy’s locker room with several boys. She was suspended and lost her co-valedictorian status. Is a school required to provide a student with due process? Does Shorb have a protected property interest in being covaledictorian?

Barrett v. Williams: Prison staff would open, read, and confiscate legal mail from Barrett’s attorney. The court held the actions of the prison officials did not violate Barrett’s right to counsel, the right to access to courts, or the right to equal treatment.

 

 

Civic Duties and Leaders

LESSON PLANS

Personal & Civic Responsibility in the U.S. and Croatia: Students compare the personal and civic responsibilities of citizens in a constitutional democracy. Students brainstorm a list of what they see as the personal and civic responsibilities of a good citizen.

4-week Unit Plan on U.S. Civic Leaders: Students will learn about the positive impacts individuals can have on their communities by researching American civic leaders. Each student profiles a unique individual, creates a timeline of key events in their life, and presents their findings to a nearby elementary school class. (Cynthia Murphy, Obsidian Middle School)

 

 

Congress and Lawmaking

2010 Summer Institute for Teachers – Special Guest Dr. Fred Beuttler, Deputy Historian for the U.S. House of Representatives

* Includes files that are too large to post online. Please contact us at office@classroomlaw.org to request a CD of the complete materials.

 

 

Consumer Law

Street Law Supplement: Introduction to Law & the Legal System; Criminal Law & Juvenile Justice; Torts; Consumer & Housing Law; Family Law; Rights in the Community

CASE STUDIES

Parrott v. Carr Chevrolet, Inc. | Opinion: Plaintiff bought a used car. Later he realized the car had problems. He sues under Oregon’s Unfair Trade Practices Act claiming the dealer failed to disclose known defects about the car.

Knepper v. Brown | Opinion: Knepper gets liposuction from a doctor who she found in the Yellow Pages. His ad said he was board certified when in fact he was not. She claims false advertising and fraud.

Viking v. Petersen: Petersen (age 19) drives a car, insured by Randle, and his passengers are killed in an accident. The insurance refuses to pay due to the driver’s age. Issues of liability insurance and freedom of contract.

Criminal Law

 

» Assault

CASE STUDIES

State of Oregon v. Scott Russell Kuperus: During the physical altercation, defendant bit off a portion of the victim’s ear. The court concluded that teeth are not dangerous weapons under Oregon’s assault statute, but that under the statute, the victim’s injury suffices as a serious physical injury.

» Distracted Driving

LESSON PLAN
Oregon’s New Distracted Driving Law

» Drunk Driving

CASE STUDIES

State v. Baty: Police arrest defendant for DUI although she never moved the car; defendant argues that DUI charge is inappropriate. Court held that the appropriate charge was “attempted DUI” even though it isn’t specifically listed in the vehicle code as an offense.

» Stalking

CASE STUDIES

Van Buskirk v. Ryan: D appealed a stalking protective order because his contacts were communicative and he never threatened her. Court held that communications alone would not warrant an SPO, but because there were other noncommunicative contacts, P had reasonable apprehension and the SPO was warranted.

Travis v. Strubel: Travis got an SPO against Strubel; appeals court reversed because there was no evidence Strubel should have known his contact was unwanted. Strubel’s freedom of speech outweighs Travis’ desire for SPO.

» Sentencing Guidelines

CASE STUDIES

State v. Davilla: D appealed the state’s use of “aggravating factors” in sentencing guidelines. The court held that the guidelines were not too vague, and that the court did not usurp legislative authority in implementing the guidelines.

» Hearsay Evidence

CASE STUDIES

State v. Cazares-Mendez: Trial court refused to allow testimonial evidence (hearsay) that another person had committed the crime because it wasn’t trustworthy. Court of Appeals remanded; state appealed to Oregon Supreme Court. Supreme Court affirmed Ct. of Appeals because trustworthiness is not relevant to the witnesses that testify, but whether the testimonies corroborated one another.

 

» Recording a Conversation

CASE STUDIES

State v. Neff: The police officer arresting Neff informed Neff that his police car camera was recording their conversation. Neff was also recording the conversation but he did not inform the officer. When the officer realized that Neff was recording the encounter, he charged Neff with illegally obtaining contents of communication.

 

» Witness Credibility

CASE STUDIES

State v. Ferguson: Defendant was accused of rape. At trial the victim’s father testified that he was very close to his daughter, and that he would not have allowed his daughter to call the police if he thought she had made a mistake, gotten drunk, and had consensual sex with the defendant. The jury convicted the defendant and the defendant appealed, arguing that the father’s statements were not admissible and that the statements were impermissible vouching for the credibility of his daughter, another witness.The Court of Appeals agreed with the defendant and remanded his case for a new trial.

 

» Aiding in Criminal Conduct

CASE STUDIES

State v. Hasedahl: The defendant physically beat the victim while another person encouraged the beating and the other individual asked the defendant to stop. The Court of Appeals held that verbal encouragement to continue an assault constituted aid by another person.

Discrimination

CASE STUDIES

State v. Dominguez-Martinez | Case: This lesson will help students examine the use of racial profiling as a law enforcement tool and explore the concept of unreasonable searches and seizures in Oregon. (Alisa Harvey, Sunset High School)

Tanner v. OHSU: OHSU’s denial of insurance benefits to homosexual domestic partners of its employees was illegal under OR constitution.

 

 

Elections

2014

Oregon Elections 2014: Governor, Senator, Initiative

Lessons focus on how to be well-informed when considering this year’s mid-term election. These lessons are downloadable after a short registration. For access, please register here.

 

Elections 101 from the Oregon Civics Conference 2011
Don DeFord & Rosalyn Lever – Secretary of State’s Office
History of Elections Powerpoint Presentation
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

2010

Classroom Law Project has a series of lessons to help teachers and students sort through the 2010 elections. They focus on two statewide races, factors influencing them, and lenses through which to analyze them. Email office@classroomlaw.org to request download access.

2008

2008 Youth Summit – Selecting the Next President: What Questions Should We Ask?

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program background | Lesson 2 – How do we pick a President? | Lesson 3 – Major Candidates | Lesson 4 – Debates | Lesson 5 – Election and Media | Lesson 6 – Constitution and Voting | Lesson 7 – Voting in Oregon | Lesson 8 – Political Cartoon Analysis | Lesson 9 – Program preparation | Lesson 10 – Program participation

Citizens need to ask important questions about the entire election process in order to fulfill their role in our representative democracy. The who, what, where, when, why, and how queries are the common denominator of our efforts to learn together.

2006

2006 Youth Summit – Ballot Initiatives: Too Much or Too Little Democracy?

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program background | Lesson 2 – Background on initiatives and significant initiatives | Lesson 3 – Pros and Cons of ballot initiatives | Lesson 4 – Money and initiatives | Lesson 5 – Analysis of the 2006 initiatives | Lesson 6 – Program preparation | Lesson 7 – Program participation | Lesson 8 – After the summit

Lessons include background on the history of initiatives in Oregon, the pros and cons of the process, the role of funding and the ten initiatives appearing on the November ballot.

2004

2004 Youth Summit – Becoming an Informed Voter in the Presidential Election

Intro | Lesson 1 – Why be an informed voter? | Lesson 2 – The President | Lesson 3 – Debates | Lesson 4 – Media | Lesson 5 – Key Issues | Lesson 6 – Polling | Lesson 7 – Program preparation | Lesson 8 – Program preparation | Lesson 9 – Program participation | Lesson 10 – After the summit

Lessons focus on how to be well-informed when considering this year’s presidential election.

 

 

Environmental Law

CASE STUDIES

City of Portland v. The Boeing Co: The groundwater near Portland’s water wells was found to be contaminated due to solvents used by Boeing.

 

 

Family Law

Street Law Supplement: Introduction to Law & the Legal System; Criminal Law & Juvenile Justice; Torts; Consumer & Housing Law; Family Law; Rights in the Community

LESSON PLANS

Child Abuse: Students develop familiarity with the history of child abuse and neglect, identify and define terms associated with child abuse and neglect, and understand and test their knowledge of circumstances and conditions where court intervention is warranted.

CASE STUDIES

State ex rel State Office for Services to Children and Families v. Lehoten | Opinion: Alcoholic mother who suffered from bipolar disorder has her parental rights terminated.

Harrington v. Daum | Opinion: Boyfriend of divorced woman seeks the right to visit her children after her death.

Jane Does v. State of Oregon | Opinion: The constitutionality of a measure that allowed adopted people over 21 to access their original birth certificates is challenged and upheld.

 

 

Housing Law

Street Law Supplement: Introduction to Law & the Legal System; Criminal Law & Juvenile Justice; Torts; Consumer & Housing Law; Family Law; Rights in the Community

CASE STUDIES

Amatisto v. Paz: Paz rented a house that had several defects, such as a leaky roof and a defective wood stove. After numerous complaints, she stopped paying her rent. Her landlord brought an eviction action.

Humbert v. Sellars: The plaintiff slipped and fell while at a friend’s apartment. The court finds the landlord liable for the plaintiff’s injuries.

Wylie v. Gresch: The plaintiffs rented an apartment from the defendant. A neighbor dog bit off the ear of the plaintiff’s daughter. The defendants failed to warn them about the vicious dog. The court said the defendant did not have a duty to warn them.

Immigration

LESSON PLANS

Immigration Lesson (5 different activities): Students investigate the themes of industrialization and immigration through readings, discussions, and viewing of art, photography, and film. (Jaimie Roderick, Obsidian Middle School)

Primary source photo activity: Students examine photography to understand, recognize, and interpret change and continuity over time. (Jaimie Roderick, Obsidian Middle School)

2007 Youth Summit – How does a “nation of immigrants” balance the benefits and the challenges of immigration?

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program background | Lesson 2 – History of immigration | Lesson 3 – Immigration stories | Lesson 4 – Immigration law 101 | Lesson 5 – Immigration law 102 | Lesson 6 – Immigration and the Economy | Lesson 7 – Program preparation | Lesson 8 – Program preparation | Lesson 9 – Program participation

Lessons span history and move forward to current controversies. Students will have opportunities to learn about immigration trends, law and policy, and economic factors.

FACT SHEETS

The American Immigration Council has a number of useful fact sheets about immigration issues. New and recently updated fact sheets include:

Judges and Judicial Conduct

LESSON PLANS

2005 Youth Summit – Selecting the Next U.S. Supreme Court Justice

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program background | Lesson 2 – Supreme Court background | Lesson 3 – Current makeup of the Supreme Court | Lesson 4 – History of the Supreme Court | Lesson 5 – Nominee John Roberts

Lesson 6 – Key Supreme Court cases about education | Lesson 7 – Citizen’s Role | Lesson 8 – Program preparation | Lesson 9 – Program participation | Lesson 10 – Program participation

Lessons on important issues to consider when selecting the next justice of the United States Supreme Court.

CASE STUDIES

The Honorable Dorothy Baker: This case about a judge who acted questionably illustrates that the legal profession does have to abide by certain ethical guidelines.

 

 

Mandatory Sentencing (Measure 11)

LESSON PLANS

You be the Judge | Handout | General Info | Measure 11: Students are given a variety of fact scenarios in which they must determine the charge and the sentence under Measure 11.

CASE STUDIES

State of Oregon v. Thorp | Opinion | Handout | General Info | Measure 11: Thorp, age 16, was convicted of 2nd degree rape for having sex with his 13 year old girlfriend and was sentenced to 75 months in jail. Does the minimum sentence of 75 months for second degree rape mandated by Measure 11 violate the “cruel and unusual punishment” clause of the Oregon Constitution?

State v. Ferman-Velasco (Brief) | Handout | General Info | Measure 11: Discusses whether Measure 11 is unconstitutional as a form of cruel & unusual punishment.

 

 

Media

Yes! to Violent Video Games? Exploring Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Assn.
Hon. Sue Leeson – Oregon Supreme Court, retired
Brown_v._ema_for_oregon_teachers.pdf
Leeson_Handouts_Combined.pdf

LESSON PLANS

2009 Youth Summit – Democracy & What’s News: What’s a Citizen To Do?

Intro | Lesson 1 – Program Background | Lesson 2 – History of “Free Press” | Lesson 3 – Supreme Court and free press | Lesson 4 – Media Savvy | Lesson 5 – What is the news? | Lesson 6 – Truth in Media | Lesson 7 – Free press around the globe | Lesson 8 – What is new media? | Lesson 9 – Program preparation | Lesson 10 – Program participation

Newsrooms, cybernews, journalism, citizen journalists. Students explore the connections between democracy, the news, and the role of citizens. Lessons range from the historical roots of free press to new social media.

 

Mock Trial

Workshop handouts Jun. 20-21, 2014

How to become familiar with the story
Mock Trial Sample Class Outline
Opening and Closing Tips (Civil) 2013
Path of a Court Case
Rule 38–Introduction of Evidence
Rule Cheat Sheet
Steps in a civil trial
Timeline
Vocabulary List Handout MT Vocab
Vocb Strategies
Warm up questions
Who said what KEY
Who said what QUIZ
Rouse – MT Workshop Handouts 2014

Workshop handouts Mar. 11 & 18, 2014

At A Glance 18 day Calendar
Elements of Civil Case checklist
Exhibits and Themes
How to become familiar with the story
Steps in a Civil Trial
TimelineWarm-up questions
Who Said What Quiz
Who Said What Key

Workshop handouts Mar. 19 & 21, 2012

Agenda
Hints for remembering witness statements
Judges Cheat Sheet 2011-12
KEY WSW quiz
MT Vocab
Order of importance exercise
Procedure for the Introduction of Exhibits
STEPS IN A CIVIL TRIAL copy 2
Timeline
Warm up Questions
WSW quizdocx

At A Glance 18 copy

Oregon Civics Conference 2011

Yes! to Violent Video Games? Exploring Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Assn.

Hon. Sue Leeson – Oregon Supreme Court, retired
Brown_v._ema_for_oregon_teachers.pdf
Leeson_Handouts_Combined.pdf

Project Citizen

Paul Nolan – Teacher Sundridge Middle School, Pendleton
PC_Resource_Packet.pdf

Elections 101

Don DeFord & Rosalyn Lever – Secretary of State’s Office
History of Elections Powerpoint Presentation
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

For Elementary Teachers

Celebrating 100 years of Women’s Suffrage:The biography of Abigail Scott Duniway (the mother of Oregon’s women’s suffrage movement) and related materials.

Political Parties

LESSON PLANS

Political Ideologies in the U.S. and Croatia: Students compare American and Croat political perspectives on living in a democracy. Students discuss the various social issues facing both countries and how those issues relate to the rise of political parties. Students are asked to explore their own political philosophies and how those ideals encourage citizen involvement in the political movements of their respective countries.

Project Citizen

LESSON PLANS

7-day Plan for Implementing Project Citizen: Using Project Citizen as a framework, students identify a problem in their community and develop a proposal to address the problem. (Pamela Long, Eagle Point High School)

PowerPoint presentation: Introduction to the Project Citizen Program and the American political system. (Pamela Long, Eagle Point High School)

Student Rights

Street Law Supplement: Introduction to Law & the Legal System; Criminal Law & Juvenile Justice; Torts; Consumer & Housing Law; Family Law; Rights in the Community

Youth Faces the Law: A Juvenile Rights Handbook produced by the Multnomah County Bar Association.

Torts

CASE STUDIES

Friedrich v. Adesman: A nanny sued parents after slipping on ice that was intentionally spilled on floor by children. Although parents couldn’t be expected to exercise control over children in that situation (they weren’t there), they can be held liable for battery that is intentionally caused by the children.

Jefferson County School District v. Fair Dismissal Appeals Board: A teacher was fired when the police found her husband was growing and selling marijuana from their home. It deals with issues of negligence, employment law, and privacy.

Knepper v. Brown | Opinion: Knepper gets liposuction from a doctor who she found in the Yellow Pages. His ad said he was board certified when in fact he was not. She claims false advertising and fraud.

Viking v. Petersen: Petersen (age 19) drives a car, insured by Randle, and his passengers are killed in an accident. The insurance refuses to pay due to the driver’s age. Issues of liability insurance and freedom of contract.

Humbert v. Sellars: The plaintiff slipped and fell while at a friend’s apartment. The court finds the landlord liable for the plaintiff’s injuries.

Wylie v. Gresch: The plaintiffs rented an apartment from the defendant. Link http://login.findlaw.com/scripts/callaw A neighbor dog bit off the ear of the plaintiff’s daughter. The defendants failed to warn them about the vicious dog. The court said the defendant did not have a duty to warn them.

Austria v. Bike Athletic Co: A products liability case in which a boy is injured when his football helmet is defective.

Solberg v. Johnson: Two friends go out and buy each other drinks. Later they are in a car accident. The friend is found to be a social host.

Lewis v. Oregon Beauty Supply Co: Plaintiff was harassed by her employer and she sued under intentional infliction of emotional distress.

Mosley v. Portland Public Schools: A student at Jefferson High is stabbed by another student. She sues the district for negligence.

Fearing v. Bucher | Opinion: A priest in Portland sexually abuses a boy. The boy sues the Archdiocese, his employer, for vicarious liability.

We the People Program

LESSON PLANS

3-month Plan for Implementing We the People Curriculum: Students will learn about the development of our democracy, from the British colonies to the creation of our current system. (Linda Saling, Eagle Rock Elementary School)

4-week Unit Plan on American Government: Using the We the People curriculum, students are introduced to the founding dialogues and documents of American government, including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitutional Convention. Students will create a comprehensive “foldable” Guide to American Government to demonstrate their understanding of key concepts and vocabulary. Other resources: Unit test, study guide, vocabulary activity, “Birth of America” timeline activity,example of completed “foldable” (Deanna Bellin, Briggs Middle School)

10-month Comprehensive Plan for WTP Implementation: Includes detailed lesson plans and student assessment templates. Other resources: Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3, Unit 4, Unit 5, Unit 6, student assessment templates (pre-test, post-test) (Tessalie Schulte & Holly Wilson, Rigler Elementary School)

All Aboard…WTP Hearing Train: Getting on track for a modified simulated congressional hearing.  Includes lesson plans and materials.

Youth Summit Program

2012 – Presidential Election Lessons
View the 2012 Presidential Election lessons.

2011 – Words Matter: Limits on Free Speech
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3A | Lesson 3B | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5 | Background Material | Youth Summit Packet
These lessons engage middle school students on arguably the most important amendment in the Bill of Rights, the First Amendment. Lessons range from the history of America’s love affair with free speech to current limits on student speech in school to speech in other countries.

2010 – Elections 2010
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5
Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9
These lessons are focused on the gubernatorial and senate races. Students learn about the offices, the candidates, and tips for sorting through the issues.

2009 – Democracy & What’s News: What’s a Citizen To Do?
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5
Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9 | Lesson 10
Newsrooms, cybernews, journalism, citizen journalists. Students explore the connections between democracy, the news, and the role of citizens. Lessons range from the historical roots of free press to new social media.

2008 – Selecting the Next President: What Questions Should We Ask?
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5
Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9 | Lesson 10
Citizens need to ask important questions about the entire election process in order to fulfill their role in our representative democracy. The who, what, where, when, why, and how queries are the common denominator of our efforts to learn together.

2007 – How does a “nation of immigrants” balance the benefits and the challenges of immigration in 2007?
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4
Lesson 5 | Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9
Lessons span history and move forward to current controversies. Students will have opportunities to learn about immigration trends, law and policy, and economic factors.

2006 – Ballot Initiatives: Too Much or Too Little Democracy?
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4
Lesson 5 | Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8
Lessons include background on the history of initiatives in Oregon, the pros and cons of the process, the role of funding and the ten initiatives appearing on the November ballot.

2005 – Selecting the Next U.S. Supreme Court Justice
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5
Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9 | Lesson 10
Lessons on important issues to consider when selecting the next justice of the United States Supreme Court.

2004 – Becoming an Informed Voter in the Presidential Election
Intro | Lesson 1 | Lesson 2 | Lesson 3 | Lesson 4 | Lesson 5
Lesson 6 | Lesson 7 | Lesson 8 | Lesson 9 | Lesson 10
Lessons focus on how to be well-informed when considering this year’s presidential election.

Updated, March 2, 2017 | We published an updated version of this list, “401 Prompts for Argumentative Writing,” as well as a companion piece, “650 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing.”

Sign up for our free weekly newsletter and get five new Student Opinion questions delivered to you every week.


If anything ever published on The Learning Network could be said to have “gone viral,” it is last February’s “200 Prompts for Argumentative Writing,” which we created to help teachers and students participate in our inaugural Student Editorial Contest.

We’ve now updated last year’s list with new questions and what we hope is more useful categorization.

So scroll through the 301 prompts below that touch on every aspect of contemporary life — from politics to sports, culture, education and technology — and see which ones most inspire you to take a stand. Each question comes from our daily Student Opinion feature, and each provides links to free Times resources for finding more information.

What issues do you care about most? Find something to write about here, or post a comment if you think we’ve missed a topic you would like to see us cover.

And if these 301 questions aren’t enough, the Room for Debate blog provides many, many more.


    TECHNOLOGY

    Technology

  1. Does Technology Make Us More Alone?
  2. Are You Distracted by Technology?
  3. Do Apps Help You or Just Waste Your Time?
  4. Do You Spend Too Much Time on Smartphones Playing ‘Stupid Games’?
  5. Will Wearable Technology Ever Really Catch On?
  6. Are Digital Photographs Too Plentiful to Be Meaningful?
  7. Do You Worry We Are Filming Too Much?
  8. Would You Want a Pair of Google’s Computer Glasses?
  9. What Role Will Robots Play in Our Future?
  10. How Many Text Messages Are Too Many?

  11. Internet and Social Media

  12. Has Facebook Lost Its Edge?
  13. Does Facebook Ever Make You Feel Bad?
  14. Would You Consider Deleting Your Facebook Account?
  15. Should What You Say on Facebook Be Grounds for Getting Fired?
  16. Should People Be Allowed to Obscure Their Identities Online?
  17. How Much Do You Trust Online Reviews?

  18. Technology in Schools

  19. Are the Web Filters at Your School Too Restrictive?
  20. Do Your Teachers Use Technology Well?
  21. Should Tablet Computers Become the Primary Way Students Learn in Class?
  22. Can Cellphones Be Educational Tools?
  23. Should Computer Games Be Used for Classroom Instruction?
  24. Is Online Learning as Good as Face-to-Face Learning?
  25. How Would You Feel About a Computer Grading Your Essays?

  26. ART, FILM, BOOKS, VIDEO GAMES AND OTHER MEDIA

    Movies, TV and Theater

  27. Is TV Stronger Than Ever, or Becoming Obsolete?
  28. Do TV Shows Like ‘16 and Pregnant’ Promote or Discourage Teenage Pregnancy?
  29. Does Reality TV Promote Dangerous Stereotypes?
  30. Does TV Capture the Diversity of America Yet?
  31. Is TV Too White?
  32. Why Do We Like to Watch Rich People on TV and in the Movies?
  33. What Makes a Good TV Show Finale?
  34. What Makes a Good Commercial?
  35. Why Did a Cheerios Ad Attract So Many Angry Comments Online?
  36. What Were the Best Movies You Saw in the Past Year?
  37. Does Live Theater Offer Something You Just Can’t Get Watching Movies or TV?

  38. Music

  39. What Can You Predict About the Future of the Music Industry?
  40. What Current Musicians Do You Think Will Stand the Test of Time?
  41. What Artists or Bands of Today Are Destined for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?
  42. What Artists Do You Consider ‘Sellouts’?
  43. What Musician, Actor or Author Should Be a Superstar, but Hasn’t Quite Made It Yet?
  44. Who Does Hip-Hop Belong To?
  45. Will Musical Training Make You More Successful?

  46. Video Games

  47. Should Video Games Be Considered a Sport?
  48. Should Stores Sell Violent Video Games to Minors?
  49. Do Violent Video Games Make People More Violent in Real Life?
  50. When Should You Feel Guilty for Killing Zombies?
  51. Can a Video Game Be a Work of Art?
  52. What Game Would You Like to Redesign?
  53. How Sexist Is the Gaming World?

  54. Literature

  55. Would You Trade Your Paper Books for Digital Versions?
  56. Does Reading a Book Count More Than Listening to One?
  57. To What Writer Would You Award a Prize?
  58. Who Are the Characters That Authors Should Be Writing About?
  59. Do You Prefer Your Children’s Book Characters Obedient or Contrary?

  60. Art

  61. Can Graffiti Ever Be Considered Art?
  62. Do We Need Art in Our Lives?
  63. Does Pop Culture Deserve Serious Study?
  64. Where Is the Line Between Truth and Fiction?
  65. Should Society Support Artists and Others Pursuing Creative Works?

  66. GENDER AND RELATIONSHIPS

    Gender Issues

  67. Do Parents Have Different Hopes and Standards for Their Sons Than for Their Daughters?
  68. Is School Designed More for Girls Than Boys?
  69. Is There Too Much Pressure on Girls to Have ‘Perfect’ Bodies?
  70. How Much Pressure Do Boys Face to Have the Perfect Body?
  71. Do Photoshopped Images Make You Feel Bad About Your Own Looks?
  72. Doctored Photos: O.K. or Not?
  73. Is It O.K. for Men and Boys to Comment on Women and Girls on the Street?
  74. Do We Need New Ways to Identify Gender and Sexuality?
  75. What Should We Do to Fight Sexual Violence Against Young Women?
  76. How Do You Feel About Rihanna and Chris Brown Getting Back Together?
  77. Why Aren’t There More Girls in Leadership Roles?
  78. Why Aren’t More Girls Choosing to Pursue Careers in Math and Science?
  79. Should Women Be Allowed to Fight on the Front Lines Alongside Men?
  80. Do You Believe in Equal Rights for Women and Men?
  81. Are Women Better at Compromising and Collaborating?
  82. Do Boys Have Less Intense Friendships Than Girls?
  83. Can a Boy Wear a Skirt to School?
  84. Is It O.K. to Refuse to Serve Same-Sex Couples Based on Religious Beliefs?

  85. Dating and Sex

  86. Should Birth Control Pills Be Available to Teenage Girls Without a Prescription?
  87. Should the Morning-After Pill Be Sold Over the Counter to People Under 17?
  88. How Should Children Be Taught About Puberty and Sex?
  89. Is Dating a Thing of the Past?
  90. Is Hookup Culture Leaving Your Generation Unhappy and Unprepared for Love?
  91. Should Couples Live Together Before Marriage?
  92. Could Following These Directions Make You Fall in Love With a Stranger?
  93. How Should Educators and Legislators Deal With Minors Who ‘Sext’?
  94. How Should Parents Address Internet Pornography?

  95. SPORTS AND ATHLETICS

    Football

  96. If Football Is So Dangerous to Players, Should We Be Watching It?
  97. Should Parents Let Their Children Play Football?
  98. Should College Football Players Get Paid?
  99. Is It Offensive for Sports Teams to Use Native American Names and Mascots?

  100. Sportsmanship

  101. Are Some Youth Sports Too Intense?
  102. Should There Be Stricter Rules About How Coaches Treat Their Players?
  103. Do Sports Teams Have a Responsibility to Hold Players to a Standard for Their Personal Conduct?
  104. Should Athletes Who Dope Have to Forfeit Their Titles and Medals?
  105. Do Fans Put Too Much Pressure on Their Favorite Professional Athletes?
  106. Does a Championship Game Always Need to Have a Winner (and a Loser)?
  107. Should Sports Betting Be Legal Everywhere?
  108. Should Colleges Fund Wellness Programs Instead of Sports?
  109. Where Should Colleges and Sports Teams Draw the Line in Selling Naming Rights?

  110. Other Sports

  111. Has Baseball Lost Its Cool?
  112. Is Cheerleading a Sport?
  113. How Big a Deal Is It That an N.B.A. Player Came Out as Gay?
  114. Would You Want a Bike Share Program for Your Community?
  115. How Young Is Too Young to Climb Mount Everest?

  116. POLITICS AND POLICY

    Government

  117. Do You Trust Your Government?
  118. If You Were Governor of Your State, How Would You Spend a Budget Surplus?
  119. What Local Problems Do You Think Your Mayor Should Try to Solve?
  120. Should Rich People Have to Pay More Taxes?
  121. What Is More Important: Our Privacy or National Security?

  122. Leadership and Politics

  123. Do Leaders Have Moral Obligations?
  124. Do Great Leaders Have to Be Outgoing?
  125. Is It Principled, or Irresponsible, for Politicians to Threaten a Shutdown?

  126. International Relations

  127. Should the U.S. Be Spying on Its Friends?
  128. When Is the Use of Military Force Justified?
  129. Should Countries Pay Ransoms to Free Hostages Held by Terrorists?

  130. Police, Prisons and Justice System

  131. Should the United States Stop Using the Death Penalty?
  132. When Should Juvenile Offenders Receive Life Sentences?
  133. What Do You Think of the Police Tactic of Stop-and-Frisk?
  134. Do Rich People Get Off Easier When They Break the Law?
  135. Should All Police Officers Wear Body Cameras?
  136. Will What Happened in Ferguson Change Anything?
  137. Should Felons Be Allowed to Vote After They Have Served Their Time?

  138. Gun Policy

  139. How Should We Prevent Future Mass Shootings?
  140. Would You Feel Safer With Armed Guards Patrolling Your School?
  141. What Is Your Relationship With Guns?
  142. Where Do You Stand on Unconcealed Handguns?
  143. Should Guns Be Permitted on College Campuses?
  144. Did a Newspaper Act Irresponsibly by Publishing the Addresses of Gun Owners?

  145. Immigration

  146. Should Millions of Undocumented Immigrants Be Allowed to Live in the U.S. Without Fear of Getting Deported?
  147. Are Children of Illegal Immigrants Entitled to a Public Education?

  148. PARENTS AND FAMILIES

    Parenting and Childhood

  149. How Much Freedom Should Parents Give Their Children?
  150. How Should Parents Discipline Their Kids?
  151. When Does Discipline Become Child Abuse?
  152. Do ‘Shame and Blame’ Work to Change Teenage Behavior?
  153. Do We Give Children Too Many Trophies?
  154. Are Adults Hurting Young Children by Pushing Them to Achieve?
  155. Is Modern Culture Ruining Childhood?
  156. How, and by Whom, Should Children Be Taught Appropriate Behavior?
  157. Are ‘Dark’ Movies O.K. for Kids?
  158. Should Halloween Costumes Portray Only ‘Positive Images’?
  159. Are Parents Violating Their Children’s Privacy When They Share Photos and Videos of Them Online?
  160. Should Children Be Allowed to Compete on TV?
  161. How Young Is Too Young for an iPhone?
  162. Should Parents Limit How Much Time Children Spend on Tech Devices?

  163. Parents and School

  164. How Should Parents Handle a Bad Report Card?
  165. How Important Are Parent-Teacher Conferences?
  166. Who Should Be Able to See Students’ Records?
  167. Would You Want to Be Home-Schooled?
  168. Should All Children Be Able to Go to Preschool?

  169. House and Home

  170. How Important Is Keeping a Clean House?
  171. Does Keeping a Messy Desk Make People More Creative?

  172. Millennial Generation

  173. What Can Older People Learn From Your Generation?
  174. Does Your Generation Have Too Much Self-Esteem?
  175. Is Your Generation Really ‘Postracial’?

  176. Becoming an Adult

  177. When Do You Become an Adult?
  178. When Should You Be Able to Buy Cigarettes, Drink Alcohol, Vote, Drive and Fight in Wars?
  179. When You Are Old Enough to Vote, Will You?

  180. CHARACTER AND MORALITY

    Personal Character

  181. Can Money Buy You Happiness?
  182. Does Buying and Accumulating More and More Stuff Make Us Happier?
  183. Are We Losing the Art of Listening?
  184. Do People Complain Too Much?
  185. Which Is More Important: Talent or Hard Work?
  186. How Important Is Keeping Your Cool?
  187. When Should You Compromise?
  188. Is Your Generation More Self-Centered Than Earlier Generations?

  189. Religion and Spirituality

  190. Do You Believe That Everything Happens for a Reason?
  191. How Much Control Do You Think You Have Over Your Fate?
  192. Can You Be Good Without God?
  193. How Important Do You Think It Is to Marry Someone With the Same Religion?

  194. Morality and Personal Responsibility

  195. Does Suffering Make Us Stronger and Lead to Success?
  196. Do Bystanders Have a Responsibility to Intervene When There is Trouble?
  197. When Is Looting Morally O.K.?
  198. Can Kindness Become Cool?

  199. Language and Standards

  200. Have Curse Words Become So Common They Have Lost Their Shock Value?
  201. What Words or Phrases Do You Think Are Overused?
  202. What Words or Phrases Should Be Retired?
  203. Do Laws That Ban Offensive Words Make the World a Better Place?
  204. Should Newspapers Reprint Cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad That Some Deem Offensive?
  205. Is It Wrong for a Newspaper to Publish a Front-Page Photo of a Man About to Die?

  206. EDUCATION

    Teaching and Learning

  207. Do Teachers Assign Too Much Homework?
  208. Does Your Homework Help You Learn?
  209. What Are You Really Learning at School?
  210. Does Class Size Matter?
  211. Do We Need a New Way to Teach Math?
  212. Does Gym Help Students Perform Better in All Their Classes?
  213. Should Reading and Math Be Taught in Gym Class Too?
  214. What Are the Best Ways to Learn About History?
  215. What Is the Right Amount of Group Work in School?
  216. What Do You Think of Grouping Students by Ability in Schools?
  217. How Important Is Arts Education?
  218. Do Schools Provide Students With Enough Opportunities to Be Creative?
  219. Does the Way Your Classroom Is Decorated Affect Your Learning?

  220. Discipline and School Rules

  221. What Are the Best Teaching Methods for Getting Students to Behave Well in Class?
  222. How Does Your School Deal With Students Who Misbehave?
  223. Should Schools Be Allowed to Use Corporal Punishment?
  224. Is Cheating Getting Worse?
  225. Should Schools Put Tracking Devices in Students’ ID Cards?
  226. Should Middle School Students Be Drug Tested?
  227. Should Students Be Barred From Taking Cellphones to School?

  228. Bullying

  229. How Big a Problem Is Bullying or Cyberbullying in Your School or Community?
  230. How Should Schools Address Bullying?
  231. How Should Schools Address Cyberbullying?
  232. What Should the Punishment Be for Acts of Cyberbullying?
  233. When Do Pranks Cross the Line to Become Bullying?
  234. How Should Schools Respond to Hazing Incidents?

  235. Time in School

  236. Should the School Day Start Later?
  237. Is Your School Day Too Short?
  238. Do You Think a Longer School Calendar Is a Good Idea?
  239. Should the Dropout Age Be Raised?
  240. Should We Rethink How Long Students Spend in High School?
  241. Should Students Be Allowed to Skip Senior Year of High School?
  242. Should Kids Head to College Early?
  243. Class Time + Substitute = Waste?
  244. Do Kids Need Recess?

  245. Grading

  246. Should Students Be Able to Grade Their Teachers?
  247. Does Your School Hand Out Too Many A’s?
  248. Do Girls Get Better Grades Than Boys in Your School?
  249. Does Separating Boys and Girls Help Students Perform Better in School?
  250. Why Do Boys Lag Behind Girls in Reading?
  251. Should Discomfort Excuse Students From Having to Complete an Assignment?

  252. Standardized Tests

  253. How Well Do You Think Standardized Tests Measure Your Abilities?
  254. How Seriously Should We Take Standardized Tests?
  255. Do You Spend Too Much Time Preparing for Standardized Tests?
  256. Should Schools Offer Cash Bonuses for Good Test Scores?

  257. School Life

  258. Would You Rather Attend a Public or a Private High School?
  259. How Much Does It Matter to You Which High School You Attend?
  260. Are Small Schools More Effective Than Large Schools?
  261. Should Home-Schoolers Be Allowed to Play Public School Sports?
  262. Should All Students Get Equal Space in a Yearbook?
  263. Should School Newspapers Be Subject to Prior Review?
  264. Is Prom Worth It?
  265. Is Prom Just an Excuse to Drink?

  266. COLLEGE AND CAREER

    College

  267. How Necessary Is a College Education?
  268. Is College Overrated?
  269. Should a College Education be Free?
  270. What Is the Perfect Number of College Applications to Send?
  271. Should Colleges Find a Better Way to Admit Students?
  272. Should Colleges Use Admissions Criteria Other Than SAT Scores and Grades?
  273. Do You Support Affirmative Action in College Admissions?
  274. Does It Matter Where You Go to College?
  275. Do College Rankings Matter?
  276. What Criteria Should Be Used in Awarding Scholarships for College?
  277. Should Engineers Pay Less for College Than English Majors?
  278. Do Fraternities Promote Misogyny?
  279. Should Colleges Ban Fraternities?

  280. Jobs and Careers

  281. Would You Quit if Your Values Did Not Match Your Employer’s?
  282. Should Employers Be Able to Review Job Applicants’ SAT Scores?
  283. Do You Worry Colleges or Employers Might Read Your Social Media Posts Someday?
  284. Would You Rather Work From Home or in an Office?
  285. Is ‘Doing Nothing’ a Good Use of Your Time?

  286. HEALTH AND NUTRITION

    Drugs, Cigarettes and Alcohol

  287. Is Smoking Still a Problem Among Teenagers?
  288. Are Antismoking Ads Effective?
  289. Is Drinking and Driving Still a Problem for Teenagers?
  290. Should Marijuana Be Legal?
  291. Should Students Be Required to Take Drug Tests?
  292. Why Is Binge Drinking So Common Among Young People in the United States?

  293. Nutrition and Food

  294. Do You Think a Healthier School Lunch Program Is a Lost Cause?
  295. Should French Fries and Pizza Sauce Count as Vegetables?
  296. How Concerned Are You About Where Your Food Comes From?
  297. Is It Ethical to Eat Meat?
  298. Is Breakfast Really the Most Important Meal of the Day?
  299. Do You Prefer Your Tacos ‘Authentic’ or ‘Appropriated’?
  300. Should Sugary Drinks Be Taxed?
  301. Should the Government Limit the Size of Sugary Drinks?

  302. Health Issues

  303. How Should Schools Handle Unvaccinated Students?
  304. Should Physician-Assisted Suicide Be Legal in Every State?
  305. Should Texting While Driving Be Illegal in Every State?
  306. Should Terminally Ill Patients Be Allowed to Die on Their Own Terms?

  307. Appearance and Fashion

  308. Should Children Be Allowed to Wear Whatever They Want?
  309. What Are Your Opinions on Cosmetic Surgery?
  310. Do ‘Saggy Pants’ Mean Disrespect?
  311. Should You Care About the Health and Safety of Those Making Your Clothing?

  312. SCIENCE TOPICS

    Science and the Environment

  313. How Concerned Are You About Climate Change?
  314. How Should Nations and Individuals Address Climate Change?
  315. Should Developers Be Allowed to Build in and Near the Grand Canyon?
  316. Should Scientists Try to Help People Beat Old Age So We Can Live Longer Lives?
  317. Given Unlimited Resources, What Scientific or Medical Problem Would You Investigate?
  318. When Is It O.K. to Replace Human Limbs With Technology?
  319. Should Fertilized Eggs Be Given Legal ‘Personhood’?

  320. Outer Space

  321. Do You Think Life Exists — or Has Ever Existed — Somewhere Besides Earth?
  322. Do You Believe in Intelligent Alien Life?
  323. Will Humans Live on Mars Someday?
  324. Would You Want to Be a Space Tourist?

  325. Animals

  326. Should Certain Animals Have Some of the Same Legal Rights As People?
  327. Is It Unethical for a Zoo to Kill a Healthy Giraffe?
  328. Should You Go to Jail for Kicking a Cat?
  329. Should You Feel Guilty About Killing Spiders, Ants or Other Bugs?
  330. How Do You Think Dinosaurs Went Extinct?

  331. MISCELLANEOUS

    Rich and Famous

  332. Should the Private Lives of Famous People Be Off Limits?
  333. Do You Think Child Stars Have It Rough?

  334. American Dream

  335. Should the United States Care That It’s Not No. 1?
  336. Is It Possible to Start Out Poor in This Country, Work Hard and Become Well-Off?
  337. Do Poor People ‘Have It Easy’?
  338. How Much Does Your Neighborhood Define Who You Are?

  339. Charity and Philanthropy

  340. Should Charities Focus More on America?
  341. What Causes Should Philanthropic Groups Finance?
  342. Is Teenage ‘Voluntourism’ Wrong?

  343. Shopping

  344. Do You Shop at Locally Owned Businesses?
  345. Is Amazon Becoming Too Powerful?
  346. Should Companies Collect Information About You?
  347. What Time Should Black Friday Sales Start?
  348. How Long Is It O.K. to Linger in a Cafe or Restaurant?
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